packconfig:

Fast Pack Friday – TAD Junkies

Here is Geoffrey Macellven’s set up of a Fast Pack Litespeed with a good collection of matching pouches. I like the symmetry of the two BC4 pouches on the top row of webbing. This pack looks well used, which is also hinted at by the currently discontinued pouches. 

The combination of the black ITW Grimloc clips, the black/OD green of the patches and the coyote/tan of the pack set up makes for a nicely coherent colour scheme. 

My only suggested would be to move the Recon pouch of the fourth image or the RDDP of the third image either up or down so they’re even, but that’s only for the sake of OCD symmetry. They are probably more functional this way around.

pouring-heart:

  1. Water tank: Filtered water is kept in the tank and slowly released into the breadbaskets below
  2. Vegetables growing in breadbasket: Breadbaskets filled with porous lava stoned are used to grow vegetables. The stones and vegetables roots trap the nutrients and filter the water which then flows into the fish tank below.
  3. Fish droppings enrich the water with nutrients for growing vegetables
  4. A variety of small vegetables can be grown such as swiss chard, cows peas, eggplants, sweet peppers, etc.
  5. Pump: A solar powered or had pump recycles the water to the top tank, ready for the cycle to start again.
  6. Chickens provide meat and eggs for consumption and/or for sale. Their droppings are captured and used to feed the fish.

Aquaponics

This unique system integrates fish, poultry and vegetable farming using recycled water. It is designed to maximise the yield of each component, whilst minimising the amount of water required. Our research has shown that Haller’s aquaponics system uses only 2% of the water conventionally needed for the same vegetable production. This is particularly important in drought-prone areas in Africa.  Haller’s aquaponics system is also affordable, it is made with low cost materials that can be found locally.

We have made several changes to this initial design – in particular to the fish tanks.  A revised illustration is currently being worked on.

Video here

(via hqcreations)

tinyhallhouse:

We are starting to get serious with the solar options for our tiny house.  We want to be totally off grid, so that we have unlimited options for where to park the tiny house, as well as be self-sustaining with water and electric.  Living in New England we realize that might mean we have to have a back up generator for bad weather.  But reaching out to the Tumblr community for advice seemed like a good idea,  since as you know there are soooo many options out there.  

Most pre made packages, like the Solman pictured above run in the $4k area.  The outback packages seem to run about that area as well.  We’d like our panels to be semi-portable (not attached to our roof) so that we can acclimate them toward a 40 degree southern exposure as much as possible and keep our tiny house in the shade.  We’be been told to use 120 watt panels and 280 watt panels.  There also seems to be a very large price difference in the deep cycle batteries and the lithium batteries. 

If anyone has had any experience with running a tiny home completely of solar I’d love to hear from you.  It seems like people use anywhere from 580watts to 1000k and above per day.    We won’t be running any tv’s, microwaves, dishwashers or laundry machines.  We are using LED lighting, alcohol stove (origo), propane heater (dickinson).   We will have 2 iMac’s, several tech devices that need charging, wireless router and small audio speaker (VERS).  Occasionally, a sewing machine.   We are still undecided about an ac, but the unit we are looking into is the Friedrich Uni-Fit Series UE08D11 which has environmentally friendly coolant, can be used as a back up electric heater, and has an eco mode.  This unit can also be set flush on the exterior with a grill plate.  Any tips from your own personal experience would be great hear!

Link for photo above:  http://www.sol-solutions.com/portable-solar-power-lighting/solman-classic-portable-solar-generators.html

(via tinyhousedarling)

ru-titley-knives:

Field testing the Companion knife .

Feathering up softwood larch for fire prep using King Alfred cake tinder fungus and one of my6mm  fire- steels struck with the spine of the high carbon steel stone- washed knife.

 Custom knives , sheaths and gear from rtknives@hotmail.com

(via the-fugitive)

tinyhousedesign:

New Post has been published on http://www.tinyhouseliving.com/tiny-prefab-cabins-for-california-state-parks/

Tiny Prefab Cabins for California State Parks

image

In an effort to modernize the experience of staying overnight at California State Park cabins, the Parks Forward Commission invited architecture students from California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, to design new cabins to be placed at campgrounds throughout the state… The Wedge [pictured here] is among the new cabin designs that will eventually be integrated into California State Parks.” – Dwell

Read more about these Modern Prefab Cabins for California State Parks at Dwell. I first spotted this at Small and Tiny Home Ideas.

dwell

dwell

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tinyhousedarling:

PBR Burner

2    beer cans
1    strip of sandpaper 
1    precision knife
1    small wad of fiberglass
1    pushpin
3    tsp. rubbing alcohol
1    wire coat hanger
1    lighter



1. Drain the contents of the first can and measure one inch from the base. Use fine sandpaper to remove the paint and any dents, then slice off this piece as cleanly and evenly as possible with your knife.
 


2. Use the bottom of the unopened can to widen the newly cut base of the first can for fitting purposes. Now empty the contents of the second can (the fun part!), sand down the base, and cut it in the same fashion.
 


3. Place a small wad of fiberglass into the base to help spread your fuel out evenly. Now work the can bottoms together until they’re even and tight, making sure there are no openings for fuel to escape.
 


4. Using a sharp pushpin, poke a cross pattern of five openings into the center of the top can (this is where you’ll pour the fuel). For the jet holes, poke 16 evenly spaced openings all along the outer ring.
 


5. Carefully pour about three teaspoons of fuel (rubbing alcohol, Everclear, denatured alcohol, or Heet) into the center holes of your stove. Clean up any spills or you’ll be sorry when it’s time for ignition.
 


6. If you don’t have a metal stand, bend a coat hanger into a stable shape that won’t fall over. For optimal cooking, configure it to hold the pot roughly four inches above the burner. You’re ready to grill!
 

tinyhousedarling:

PBR Burner

2    beer cans

1    strip of sandpaper

1    precision knife

1    small wad of fiberglass

1    pushpin

3    tsp. rubbing alcohol

1    wire coat hanger

1    lighter

pbrBurner_article02.jpg




1. Drain the contents of the first can and measure one inch from the base. Use fine sandpaper to remove the paint and any dents, then slice off this piece as cleanly and evenly as possible with your knife.

 

pbrBurner_article03.jpg





2. Use the bottom of the unopened can to widen the newly cut base of the first can for fitting purposes. Now empty the contents of the second can (the fun part!), sand down the base, and cut it in the same fashion.

 

pbrBurner_article04.jpg





3. Place a small wad of fiberglass into the base to help spread your fuel out evenly. Now work the can bottoms together until they’re even and tight, making sure there are no openings for fuel to escape.

 

pbrBurner_article05.jpg





4. Using a sharp pushpin, poke a cross pattern of five openings into the center of the top can (this is where you’ll pour the fuel). For the jet holes, poke 16 evenly spaced openings all along the outer ring.

 

pbrBurner_article06.jpg





5. Carefully pour about three teaspoons of fuel (rubbing alcohol, Everclear, denatured alcohol, or Heet) into the center holes of your stove. Clean up any spills or you’ll be sorry when it’s time for ignition.

 

pbrBurner_article066.jpg





6. If you don’t have a metal stand, bend a coat hanger into a stable shape that won’t fall over. For optimal cooking, configure it to hold the pot roughly four inches above the burner. You’re ready to grill!

 

(via tinyhousedarling)

Emberlit Fire Ant

atac-wolfe:

image

Turns out Emberlit is actually firing up a new project (no pun intended) on kickstarter…
They’re developing the “Fire Ant.”
A smaller more lightweight version of the full size titanium model, marketed towards backpackers.

I for one have to say I am extremely interested in this… I…

(via tinyhousedarling)